7/31/22

Death of a Classmate - David Rudolph Raunig - 5th Co.

David Rudolph Raunig, 91, of Williamsburg, VA, passed away at his home Tuesday, July 12, 2022. Born in Great Falls, MT, David graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1954. David served as a Naval aviator for 24 years and was a Vietnam veteran. He extended his career as a Life Underwriter for GPM Life Insurance Company. David is survived by his wife of 68 years, Coralie and his four children, David (Robin), Deborah Raunig-Salvatorelli (Robert), Denise Raunig Lee (David), and Diana Bower (John); 13 grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren. A Mass will be held Tuesday, July 26, 2022 at St. Bede Catholic Church, 3686 Ironbound Rd., Williamsburg at 12:00PM. In lieu of flowers, a memorial donation in David’s name may be made to ALSAC/St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105 (www.stjude.org) Fond memories and expressions of sympathy may be shared at www.NelsenWilliamsburg.com for the Raunig family. Nelsen Williamsburg 3785 Strawberry Plains Rd. Williamsburg, VA 23188 757-608-2850

5/29/22

Death of a Wife - Fride Egidius Philpot

Death of a Wife - Fride Egidius Philpot Fride Egidius Philpot, 89, of Cottage Grove, OR, passed away on the morning of Monday, May 9, 2022. She was born Oct 1, 1932, in Brummen, Netherlands, the fourth daughter of Dr. Thorvald Fredrick Egidius and Emmerentia Haaze van Doorninck. She grew up in Ramstad, a suburb of Oslo, Norway where she skied to school in the winter and often knitted during lectures. She loved visiting the family cottage, cross-country skiing, hiking, and orienteering in the mountains, learning Latin names of wildflowers from her father, and participating in the Girl Scouts. Her idyllic life drastically changed during the German occupation of Norway during WWII, a period full of stories of hardship, hunger, and cross-fire that she would later tell to her children and grandchildren. She met the love of her life, Marvin Philpot of Garden City, KS in 1951 when, as a midshipman of the US Naval Academy, he visited Oslo for five days. Though their time together was brief, Fride knew he would come back for her. Their romance continued during three years of letter writing until they were reunited for Marvin’s graduation, when he proposed to her. They were married shortly after in Norway on September 16, 1954. During Marvin’s active duty, Fride was an exceptional Navy wife, caring for home and three young children while her husband was at sea and organizing family camping trips, volunteering, and cooking holiday dinners for enlisted men when he was home. She also worked for the Navy Relief Society and perfected her renowned organizational and packing skills during 16 moves in 18 years as Marvin was assigned to various bases along the Eastern seaboard, from upstate New York to Key West, FL, as well as one move to California. After Marvin was transferred to Offutt AFB in Bellevue, NE, a new chapter of life began for Fride on the Philpot family farm in Cass County. She cherished the quiet countryside, where, with a fourth young child in tow, she planted an enormous vegetable garden and numerous flower beds. Always a woman deeply connected with nature, she preferred to work without gardening gloves so she could savor the rich earth between her fingers, and she never ceased to find new ways to share her love with the local animals of the farm. She installed bird houses and faithfully filled their feeders, rehabilitated and released wounded birds and orphaned baby rabbits, and provided a home for an astounding variety of critters in need—including a 13-striped ground squirrel, a raccoon, a lost kitten, and an abundance of dogs. Later in life she even adopted a capricious though unforgettable donkey! Owls were particularly close to her heart, their shining wide eyes found everywhere about the farm house, from trinkets that adorned the shelves to her cozy sweaters—the memorable Fride aesthetic. Fride loved crafts and was always busy creating, whether clothes, afghans, baby blankets, shawls, hats, scarves, quilts, home textiles, needlework art or Christmas decorations. She shared this love of craft with the many girls in her charge as a Girl Scout troop leader in Weeping Water and devoted sweaty weeks every August to the craft department of the Cass County Fair. Her Norwegian and Dutch roots formed the foundation of many family traditions, especially at Christmas, which brimmed with an abundance of Scandinavian decorations on display and dozens of varieties of cookies she baked and happily shared with eager recipients. She enjoyed many return trips to Norway, visiting family and reveling in the beauty of the country she always considered home. Her beloved husband passed in 1990 but she stayed at their farm for many years, bravely navigating a new life without her Love, displaying inspiring fortitude and resourcefulness. She devoted her time to friends and family, her job at the Offutt Officers Spouses Club Thrift Shoppe, and the organizations dear to her heart: the Henry Doorly Zoo and the Nebraska Girl Scout Order of the Silver Trefoil, the latter of which she was member until the day she passed. Since his passing, Fride always believed that Marvin was waiting for her. And now they are indeed reunited: the tall, handsome naval officer and the beautiful, strong Dutch-Norwegian woman, once again side by side. She is survived by her children Emmerentia Guthrie, Catherine Anderson, Lloyd Philpot, and Mary-Rose Joshi; grandchildren, Emmerentia Jo, Corey, Tyler, Spencer, Chase, Meera and Nathan; great-grandchildren, Emmerentia Lynn, Connor, Hadley, Sloane, Riley and Callum. She is also survived by her constant canine companion, Maggie. In addition to her parents, Fride was preceded in death by her beloved husband, Marvin Philpot, her sisters Nanna Helle, Emmerentia Egidius, and Quirina Stenersen, and daughter Mary Elizabeth. A private family service will be held. Please visit the Tribute Wall above if you would like to light a candle for Fride or share a story or memory with her family. Fride was a generous woman that supported many charities, including those listed below. In lieu of flowers you can choose to donate to an organization listed under Memorial Contributions or plant a tree. NOTE about Wildlife Safari (Winston, OR): This is an organization new to Fride – she visited this park 2 or 3 times this last year and intended to make a donation but didn’t get the chance before passing. She was very impressed with this park and strongly believed in their conservation efforts, so if you want to choose one, it would have meant a great deal to her for this place to receive funds on her behalf. Smith Lund Mills Funeral Chapel & Crematorium 123 South Seventh Street Cottage Grove, OR 97424 https://www.smithlundmills.com/obituaries/Fride-Egidius-Philpot?obId=24905607#/obituaryInfo ...

Death of a Classmate - CAPT Frederick J. Kollmorgen - 9th Co

 

 CAPT Frederick J. Kollmorgen  (March 7, 1932 - May 24, 2022)

Captain Frederick J. Kollmorgen, USN (Ret) died on May 24, 2022 in Exeter, NH. He was 90 years old.  After attending the Severn School, Fred graduated from the Naval Academy with the 9th Company.  Following graduation, he was assigned to the destroyer COMPTON, and served there until attending Submarine School.  After Sub School, he spent 2 years on the diesel submarine STICKLEBACK before completing nuclear power training in June 1959.  After nuclear power school and the prototype, he was assigned to the submarines SKATE, THOMAS JEFFERSON, and PERMIT (as CO).  After his tour on the PERMIT, he went to the Naval Sea Systems Command in Washington.  He spent 6 years there as manager of the Submarine Noise Reduction Program, SSN Project Officer, SSBN Project Office, and Director of the Ship Silencing Division.  Following the NAVSEA tour, he reported to the Commander Submarine Force, Atlantic Fleet, and served there as Assistant Chief of Staff for Material.  After the COMSUBLANT assignment, he went to the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard and was assigned there as Planning Officer until his retirement from the Navy in June 1982.  His service awards include the Legion of Merit and Meritorious Service Medal.
After moving to Exeter, Fred worked for 15 years in Portsmouth, NH, for the Essex Corporation and for the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics.  He was active in the Exeter Rotary Club, the choir of the Christ Episcopal Church, the Exeter Historic District Commission, the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests, and as an income tax preparer for the AARP Tax Aide Program.  He also spent many hours and dollars trying to keep his family’s 1840 house in the historic district in commission.
Fred and his family enjoyed many summers at their cottage on Lake Winnipesaukee in Wolfeboro, NH.  He particularly liked racing his Pearson Ensign sloop on the lake, frequently as an also-ran, but having a great time nonetheless.
He is survived by Diane, his spouse of 66 years; 4 sons, Stuart, Andrew, Matthew, and John; their spouses; and 11 grandchildren.
Brewitt Funeral Home, 14 Pine St., Exeter, NH is handling the arrangements.
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Exeter Historical Society, PO Box 924, Exeter, NH 03833
Brewitt Funeral Home, LLC
14 Pine Street
Exeter, NH 03833
603-772-3554

4/24/22

Our Poets April poem - THE DRUMMER AND THE GENERAL

 April 2022 Pome

 

                             THE DRUMMER AND THE GENERAL *

                                Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., 5 April 1863

 

            "Now, boy, " said the General quietly, "You are the heart of the army.

              Think of that. You're the heart of the army. Listen now."

                                           -- Ray Bradbury, "The Drummer Boy of Shiloh"

 

            Young Joby, the drummer, lay sleepless, in the cool of an April night,

            Staring up through the darkness. In the morning there'd be a fight.

            He was frightened and most unready, his eyes and his cheeks were damp,

            And he wondered about the army, stretched out in their slumbering camp.

 

            A footstep crunched in the shadows, the boots of a man with stars,

            He smelt of brass and leather, the smoke of his good cigars--

            His sabre clinked in its scabbard as he knelt at the drummer's side,

            "Is that you, boy?" he murmured, Joby nodded, eyes opened wide.

 

            "I hope you're done with the weeping, as I was, an hour ago."

            "You cried?" "To be sure," said the General, "it's a pain all soldiers know.

            I order my boys into battle, knowing well that some shall die,

            But my tears are shed in private--the troops mustn't see me cry."

 

            "Now harken, lad, it's important. Tomorrow, you're in command,

            For the battle hangs on the drummer, a boy of the regiment's band.

            This army of fifty thousand must have but a single mind,

            And the drummer's the one true leader, when the General's left behind.

 

            "If you rap out a lazy drumbeat, the cadence a mite too slow,

            The men's blood won't be warming, going in against the foe-

            They're young, all unused to battle, untrained as a flock of lambs,

            One day they're their mother's children, the next, they are Captain Sam's.

 

            "I dare not say to those mothers that I wasted their precious sons,

            So, boy, drum a rattling quickstep, and we'll take those enemy guns,

            Tomorrow we'll break those Rebels, we'll win us a victory.

            I've done my best for the army, will you now do this for me?"

 

            The General paused, and the drummer thought hard, for a brave reply,

            "Well, sir," he managed to stammer, "I don't know, but I'll surely try!"

            "That's good enough," said the General, and his sabre jingled again,

            As he rose to resume his pacing, the facing of soul-deep pain.

 

            His bootsteps faded in darkness, and the boy closed a peaceful eye,

            Peach-petals tapped on his drumhead, unseen under soft spring sky,

            Around him slumbered the army, fifty thousand boys in blue,

            And Joby slept well until morning--he knew what he had to do.

 

            4-27-97

 

4/8/22

REUNION

 Received the following from Bill Greenlaw


Class of 1954 mark your calendars!! The dates of our 70th Reunion have been set. Our 70th Reunion will be held on April 24, 25, and 26 April, 2024 (coincidentally the same dates as our 65th Reunion) in Annapolis Maryland. Hopefully the Brigade Dress Parade will not be rained-out this time.
 
We will make a selection of our "Headquarters Hotel" soon. We are looking forward to getting proposals from both the "Crowne Plaza" hotel", near the Westfield Annapolis Mall, and the "Graduate Annapolis" hotel, formerly the Loews hotel, by the end of the month.

 image005-727520-758926-780884.jpg


Ok, 54. Time for one last river to cross. I’m asking you to participate in what may be one of the last class functions.

The Class of 1954 Seventh Reunion.

The last few years have been rough for me, the loss of Donna, the move to Westminster, and time and tide acting on the old body. I failed to provide all the services that I provided as 54’s webmaster for so many years.

But I’m starting one last push to make the Seventh Reunion one we will all remember. I for one. don’t remember things too well so it may take quite an effort. Please give me all the help you can.

I’m not involved in the planning and administration of the Reunion. The gang over in Annapolis is handing that. My only contribution is to attempt to maximize support and participation by the class.

To start with sending me an email. That will give me a list of classmates who want to follow this reunion whether they can attend or just want to follow it at home.

I’ll publish a list of participants on the class website – 54net.org

Beat Army

Will

3/9/22

Death of a classmate - Allen Hobbs Jr.


 


Allen Hobbs Jr.  (July 6, 1932 – January 27, 2022)

Allen Hobbs, Jr died on January 27, 2022, of complications related to melanoma surrounded by his dear family at his home in Bethesda, Maryland. He was 89.
Allen was born to Captain Allen Hobbs and Fayette Purcell Hobbs on July 6, 1932 in Washington, D.C. He graduated from the Landon School in 1950 and attended the U. S. Naval Academy serving as Captain of the pistol team earning All American and graduating in 1954. His early service included assignments in gunnery and operations on destroyers all over the world. He later excelled in deep sea diving leading teams to map underwater terrain in the Pacific Ocean. After 13 years of service, Allen met and later married the love of his life, Shannon Hamm in California. They lived there before moving back to Bethesda where he designed and operated large mainframe computer systems for central data processing. He worked at American Finance, Touche Ross, and IBMI before joining the National Education Association where he ran IT and networking for 25 years.
Allen loved to sail the Chesapeake Bay with friends and family and spent summers with his family in Fenwick Island, Delaware. He was an avid and competitive racer all over the U.S. winning first place in the coveted Annapolis Yacht Club Spring Series Race in 1961.
He and his beloved Shannon were married for 58 wonderful years and raised their family in Bethesda living in their home for nearly all of those years. Allen will be remembered as the consummate gentleman, someone who showed kindness to everyone he met and for his humility.
He is survived by close family members: his wife, daughter Allison Hobbs Giles (Thomas), Allen Hamm Hobbs (Deborah), and all of his beloved grandchildren, including Logan Giles, Patrick Giles, Ryan Giles, Allen John Hobbs, and Elizabeth Hobbs.
Visitation will be held March 14, 2022 at 10:30 a.m. to be immediately followed by a funeral mass at 11:30 a.m. at Our Lady of Mercy Church in Potomac, MD. A private burial will be held at the U.S. Naval Academy on March 15 in Annapolis, MD.
In lieu of flowers, please consider a contribution to the Little Sisters of the Poor.
Joseph Gawler’s Sons, LLC
5130 Wisconsin Ave NW
Washington, DC 20016
202-407-7554
https://www.dignitymemorial.com/obituaries/washington-dc/allen-hobbs-10577814

2/28/22

Our Poets March Poem - THE WOEFUL WINDS OF MARCH

  

                       THE WOEFUL WINDS OF MARCH                            

                      Or, A Punxsatawney Prognosticator's Putrid Prediction

 

                      Shall I compare March to a summer's day?

                      The weather-watching wizards all say nay--

                      Wind switches rapidly from west to east,

                      Fulfilling the worst words of furry beast.

 

                      Prepare for sunny hours, then howling snows,

                      When nose and toes, even mercury froze,

                      Followed by balmy airs and mildest breezes

                      Accompanied by agues, coughs and sneezes.

 

                      In Maryland, expect the unexpected,

                      With scents and common sense alike rejected.

 

                      2-27-22

 

2/7/22

Alumni Survey

 

                Post at : https://www.usna.com/login?bm=-727469543

2/2/22

Our Poets February Poem - WASHINGTON, AT TRENTON

                          

                                           WASHINGTON, AT TRENTON

                                               26 December 1776

 

                                    Foul blew the winter’s air,
                                    Soldiers were in despair,
                                    Ice choked the Delaware,
                                      Marsh and reed-bordered.
                                    Prospects of deepest black,
                                    Giving his map a whack,
                                    “We shall attack–attack!”
                                      Washington ordered.
 
                                    “Think–how on Christmas Day,
                                    Deeming us far away,
                                    The Hessian hogs will say
                                       ‘Drink and be merry!’
                                    While with vainglorious boasts
                                    They are exchanging toasts,
                                    We–ragged, starving ghosts–
                                       Cross at the ferry.
 
                                    “Marshaling, one by one,
                                    Each soldier, horse and gun,
                                    By the first light of sun
                                       Tomorrow morning,
                                    Roust from its downy bed
                                    The aching Hessian head,
                                    Spatter the snow with red,
                                       Strike without warning!”
 
                                    Thus, in the wind and sleet,
                                    Marching on bloody feet,
                                    Troops mustered to the beat
                                       Of bone-chilled drummers,
                                    Down to the frozen shore,
                                    (Bad night to wage a war–
                                    Not to be thawed, men swore,
                                       By twenty summers).

                                    Soldiers in tattered coats,

                                    Filing aboard the boats,

                                    Hearts throbbed in many throats–

                                      Perilous crossing!

                                    On, through the swirling snows,

                                    As feet and fingers froze,

                                    Oared amid jagged floes,

                                       Grinding and tossing.

 

                                    On the New Jersey side

                                    Scouts raced ahead to guide,

                                    “Forward!” the general cried,

                                      “Sweep to surround ‘em!

                                    Doubtless they’re sleeping yet–

                                    What though your powder’s wet,

                                    Charge with the bayonet,

                                       Crush and confound ‘em!”

 

                                    As the pale sun arose,

                                    Breaking the German’s doze,

                                    “Turn out! Here come our foes!”

                                      His sentries shouted,

                                    Sounding alarm, too late–

                                    Knox’s guns lent their weight,

                                    Cannon fired fast and straight,

                                      Hessians were routed!

 

                                    Down icy streets they ran,

                                    Terror on every man,

                                    “Fly, save yourselves who can!”

                                       Their troops were crying;

                                    Unhappy Colonel Rall,

                                    Pierced by a musket-ball,

                                    Yielded his sword, to fall,

                                       Conquered and dying.


                                 The guns of Freedom spoke,

                                 Chain of disasters broke–

                                 Washington’s master-stroke

                                    Turning the tables;

                                 Britons, in dark dismay,

                                 Asking themselves if they

                                 Must buy, as one might say,

                                     “A suit of sables”.

 

                              Soundly defeated, then

                              Turning to fight again,

                              Stauncher than stout Turenne,

                                  Bolder and grander–

                             Washington! Born to lead,

                             Winning by stealth and speed,

                             God send us, in our need,

                                Such a commander!

 

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